Wednesday, April 1News That Matters

Health News

Can hydroxychloroquine prevent COVID-19? Study aims to find answers – Fox News

Can hydroxychloroquine prevent COVID-19? Study aims to find answers – Fox News

Health News
Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox.  Sign up here.Currently, there is no known cure for the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the globe, but one possible remedy, the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine, has received increased attention in recent weeks. A new study aims to confirm whether or not that attention is warranted.The study, which will be conducted by the University of Washington in conjunction with New York University, looks to enroll 2,000 people who are "close contacts of persons with confirmed or pending COVID-19 diagnoses," according to a statement announcing the study."We currently don’t know if hydroxychloroquine works, but we will learn in as short a timeframe as possible what the outcome is,” principal investigator Ruanne
Restrictions are slowing coronavirus infections, new data suggest – Boston.com

Restrictions are slowing coronavirus infections, new data suggest – Boston.com

Health News
Harsh measures, including stay-at-home orders and restaurant closures, are contributing to rapid drops in the numbers of fevers — a signal symptom of most coronavirus infections — recorded in states across the country, according to intriguing new data produced by a medical technology firm. At least 248 million Americans in at least 29 states have been told to stay at home. It had seemed nearly impossible for public health officials to know how effective this measure and others have been in slowing the coronavirus. But the new data offer evidence, in real time, that tight social-distancing restrictions may be working, potentially reducing hospital overcrowding and lowering death rates, experts said. Advertisement The company, Kinsa Health, which produces internet-connected thermome
Days After a Funeral in a Georgia Town, Coronavirus ‘Hit Like a Bomb’ – The New York Times

Days After a Funeral in a Georgia Town, Coronavirus ‘Hit Like a Bomb’ – The New York Times

Health News
It was an old-fashioned Southern funeral.There was a repast table crammed with casseroles, Brunswick stew, fried chicken and key lime cake. Andrew Jerome Mitchell, a retired janitor, was one of 10 siblings. They told stories, debated for the umpteenth time how he got the nickname Doorface.People wiped tears away, and embraced, and blew their noses, and belted out hymns. They laughed, remembering. It was a big gathering, with upward of 200 mourners overflowing the memorial chapel, so people had to stand outside.Dorothy Johnson has gone over the scene in her mind over the last month, asking herself who it was who brought the virus to her brother’s funeral.“We don’t know who the person was,” she said. “It would help me to know.”During the weeks that followed, illnesses linked to the coronavi
We shouldn't rush to use an unproven malaria drug to treat the coronavirus – STAT

We shouldn't rush to use an unproven malaria drug to treat the coronavirus – STAT

Health News
As the pandemic deepens, physicians face an agonizing decision — to medicate or not to medicate? Here’s the dilemma: Over the past few weeks, some small studies suggested a decades-old malaria drug called hydroxychloroquine may have the potential to combat the novel coronavirus known as Covid-19. And as the results trickled out, the tablet has become more valuable than gold. Prescriptions and hospital orders jumped, causing shortages. State pharmacy boards, in fact, claimed some doctors were hoarding the medicine for themselves. President Trump touted the tablet by saying he had a “feeling” it would work. The widely watched conservative TV host Laura Ingraham tweeted that one seriously ill patient recovered like “Lazarus” after being given hydroxychloroquine. advertisement At the urging
Nurses die, doctors fall sick, and panic rises on virus front lines – Boston.com

Nurses die, doctors fall sick, and panic rises on virus front lines – Boston.com

Health News
NEW YORK — A supervisor urged surgeons at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in Manhattan to volunteer for the front lines because half the intensive-care staff had already been sickened by coronavirus. “ICU is EXPLODING,” she wrote in an email. A doctor at Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan described the unnerving experience of walking daily past an intubated, critically ill colleague in her 30s, wondering who would be next. Another doctor at a major New York City hospital described it as “a petri dish,” where more than 200 workers had fallen sick. Two nurses in city hospitals have died. The coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 30,000 people in New York City, is beginning to take a toll on those who are most needed to combat it: the doctors, nurses and other w
CDC is weighing advising Americans to wear face masks outdoors – Yahoo News

CDC is weighing advising Americans to wear face masks outdoors – Yahoo News

Health News
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is considering whether to update its guidelines on the new coronavirus to advise Americans to wear homemade masks outside of the home — not so much to protect the people wearing the mask but as another tool to limit the spread of COVID-19, The Washington Post reports. The new virus is spread mainly through saliva droplets emitted during a cough, sneeze, or even talking, and having a mask to capture those drops would presumably keep sick, especially asymptomatic, coronavirus carriers from spreading the disease.The CDC currently recommends keeping six feet apart, among other social distancing practices, and washing hands frequently and thoroughly for 20 seconds. It would not recommend people use surgical or N95 masks, in short supply and
CDC considering recommending Americans wear face masks in public: report – TheBlaze.com

CDC considering recommending Americans wear face masks in public: report – TheBlaze.com

Health News
Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are mulling over whether to issue guidance recommending that Americans wear face masks while out in public, but want to make it "clear" that medical masks should be reserved for health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report. What are the details? The Washington Post reported Monday that the CDC is "considering altering the official guidance to encourage people to take measures to cover their faces amid the coronavirus pandemic," according to multiple unnamed sources. One official "said the new guidance would make clear that the general public should not use medical masks — including surgical and N95 masks — that are in desperately short supply and needed by health-care workers,
Nurses Die, Doctors Fall Sick and Panic Rises on Virus Front Lines – msnNOW

Nurses Die, Doctors Fall Sick and Panic Rises on Virus Front Lines – msnNOW

Health News
A supervisor urged surgeons at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in Manhattan to volunteer for the front lines because half the intensive-care staff had already been sickened by coronavirus. © Gregg Vigliotti for The New York Times Nurses at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx gathered early Saturday to protest a shortage of protective equipment, including N95 masks. “ICU is EXPLODING,” she wrote in an email.Sign Up For the Morning Briefing Newsletter A doctor at Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan described the unnerving experience of walking daily past an intubated, critically ill colleague in her 30s, wondering who would be next.Bing COVID-19 tracker: Latest numbers by country and state Another doctor at a major New York City hospital described it as “
How would overwhelmed hospitals decide who to treat first? – The Associated Press

How would overwhelmed hospitals decide who to treat first? – The Associated Press

Health News
NEW YORK (AP) — A nurse with asthma, a grandfather with cancer and a homeless man with no known family are wracked with coronavirus-induced fevers. They are struggling to breathe, and a ventilator could save their lives. But who gets one when there aren’t enough to go around? Health care workers are dreading the prospect of such dire scenarios as U.S. hospitals brace for a looming surge in patients who need breathing machines and other resources that could soon be in critically short supply. That has meant dusting off playbooks they’ve never before had to implement on how to fairly ration limited resources during an emergency. “I pray for their good judgment and their capacity as they make very difficult choices,” said Erik Curren, whose 77-year-old father died this month from respiratory
“I feel like we're all just being sent to slaughter” – Hot Air

“I feel like we're all just being sent to slaughter” – Hot Air

Health News
A doctor at Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan described the unnerving experience of walking daily past an intubated, critically ill colleague in her 30s, wondering who would be next.Another doctor at a major New York City hospital described it as “a petri dish,” where more than 200 workers had fallen sick… “I feel like we’re all just being sent to slaughter,” said Thomas Riley, a nurse at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx, who has contracted the virus, along with his husband. Medical workers are still showing up day after day to face overflowing emergency rooms, earning them praise as heroes. Thousands of volunteers have signed up to join their colleagues. But doctors and nurses said they can look overseas for a dark glimpse of the risk they are facing, especially when protective